Family Security Matters » Publications » Somali Instability Still Poses Threat Even After Successful Strike on Nabhan

The United States struck an important blow against Islamist terrorism in the Horn of Africa earlier this week when, in the middle of the day on Monday, Special Operations Forces swooped down on a vehicle bearing militants on a dirt road near the town of Baraawe, south of Mogadishu about halfway to Kismayo, and, opening fire, killed Saleh Ali Saleh Nabhan, the ringleader of the cell of al Qaeda in East Africa responsible for the 2002 bombing of an Israeli-owned hotel in Mombasa, Kenya, and the simultaneous attempt to down an Israeli commercial airliner. The target was also implicated in the 1998 bombings of the U.S. embassies in Dar es Salaam Tanzania, and Nairobi, Kenya. Most recently, Nabhan, a Kenyan national of Yemeni origin, was running terrorist training camps and bringing in foreign trainers and fighters to support al-Shabaab (“the youth”), an al-Qaeda-linked group that was formally designated a “foreign terrorist organization” by the U.S. Department of State last year, and the Hisbul Islam (“Islamic party”) group of Sheikh Hassan Dahir ‘Aweys, a figure who appears personally on both United States and United Nations antiterrorism sanctions lists, in their insurgency against the weak “Transitional Federal Government” (TFG) of Somalia

Family Security Matters » Publications » Somali Instability Still Poses Threat Even After Successful Strike on Nabhan

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